Photo
tabletopresources:

D&D HAZARD (3.5e)
Shriekers are fungi that emit a loud noise to attract prey or when disturbed. Shriekers live in dark, subterranean places, often in the company of violet fungi, whose poison they are immune to.
Shriekers and predators such as violet fungi often work together to attract and kill prey. When the shriekers’ hellish racket attracts a curious creature, the violet fungus tries to kill it. Both creatures enjoy the fruits of a successful hunt.

VARIATION:
The basic concept behind the shrieker is that of bait. The intended victim is drawn in by whatever means and is then vulnerable to attack via ambush, loss of advantage, or even just unfamiliarity with the terrain, creature, or situation in general. The monster(s) can then use this to their advantage.
WARNING: Have you seen the movie The Ruins? If not SPOILER ahead in the first suggestion.
The Ruins is essentially a movie that’s GREAT for DMs who needed a little inspiration in how to use a plant creature as a very viable and deadly threat. Highly recommended even if just for the inspiration alone. It used most of the ideas below.
Plant monsters that trigger a sonic attack when near, or that have risk of deafening characters who draw close.
Plants that can create other sounds (like a crying woman, or a man shouting for help) or mimic sounds they’ve heard before (such as one companion yelling to another to “come here”)
Plants (especially fruits, berries, etc) can often be poisonous in real life. Imagine how plants could have developed means to poison others who eat them, or even make contact. Get creative and think outside of the usual conditions of nauseated, ability damage, or paralysis. For a start, check out some of the other conditions for inspiration.
Consider how normally beneficial conditions and effects can be double-edged swords. This has the added effect of enforcing player agency as they have choices to make, some give or take, on whether benefits outweigh the cost. Imagine eating a plant to become incorporeal for example, only to later realize that either (1) the plant is eating your body while your mind or spirit are elsewhere or (2) your crossing to another plane has attracted the attention of very dangerous entities that occupy that realm.
Plant monsters certainly need not be stationary, but it’s sometimes fun to think of how they handle the challenge of making their prey come to them. Do monsters know to drive prey toward the area? Does the plant grow near other traps, such as pits, quicksand, or in dungeon cells? Does the plant attract prey via spores that cause hallucinations or just a pleasant high that draws them in?
These are just some examples of how plant types can become great environmental hazards and truly threaten your players. I’m interested to see what other ideas you folks come up with!
Check out Tabletop Gaming Resources for more art, tips and tools for your campaign!

tabletopresources:

D&D HAZARD (3.5e)

Shriekers are fungi that emit a loud noise to attract prey or when disturbed. Shriekers live in dark, subterranean places, often in the company of violet fungi, whose poison they are immune to.

Shriekers and predators such as violet fungi often work together to attract and kill prey. When the shriekers’ hellish racket attracts a curious creature, the violet fungus tries to kill it. Both creatures enjoy the fruits of a successful hunt.

VARIATION:

The basic concept behind the shrieker is that of bait. The intended victim is drawn in by whatever means and is then vulnerable to attack via ambush, loss of advantage, or even just unfamiliarity with the terrain, creature, or situation in general. The monster(s) can then use this to their advantage.

WARNING: Have you seen the movie The Ruins? If not SPOILER ahead in the first suggestion.

  • The Ruins is essentially a movie that’s GREAT for DMs who needed a little inspiration in how to use a plant creature as a very viable and deadly threat. Highly recommended even if just for the inspiration alone. It used most of the ideas below.
  • Plant monsters that trigger a sonic attack when near, or that have risk of deafening characters who draw close.
  • Plants that can create other sounds (like a crying woman, or a man shouting for help) or mimic sounds they’ve heard before (such as one companion yelling to another to “come here”)
  • Plants (especially fruits, berries, etc) can often be poisonous in real life. Imagine how plants could have developed means to poison others who eat them, or even make contact. Get creative and think outside of the usual conditions of nauseated, ability damage, or paralysis. For a start, check out some of the other conditions for inspiration.
  • Consider how normally beneficial conditions and effects can be double-edged swords. This has the added effect of enforcing player agency as they have choices to make, some give or take, on whether benefits outweigh the cost. Imagine eating a plant to become incorporeal for example, only to later realize that either (1) the plant is eating your body while your mind or spirit are elsewhere or (2) your crossing to another plane has attracted the attention of very dangerous entities that occupy that realm.
  • Plant monsters certainly need not be stationary, but it’s sometimes fun to think of how they handle the challenge of making their prey come to them. Do monsters know to drive prey toward the area? Does the plant grow near other traps, such as pits, quicksand, or in dungeon cells? Does the plant attract prey via spores that cause hallucinations or just a pleasant high that draws them in?

These are just some examples of how plant types can become great environmental hazards and truly threaten your players. I’m interested to see what other ideas you folks come up with!

Check out Tabletop Gaming Resources for more art, tips and tools for your campaign!

(Source: earth-witch)

Photo
rpgprotip:

The real RPG PRO-TIP: This one’s for the purists. Remember, you can play Pathfinder and make it your own. D&D is still D&D without a few of it’s mechanics (looking at you, grapple). Take 10. Take 20. If there’s no threat, take 30! As long as everyone is having fun at the table, you’re playing it right!

rpgprotip:

The real RPG PRO-TIP: This one’s for the purists. Remember, you can play Pathfinder and make it your own. D&D is still D&D without a few of it’s mechanics (looking at you, grapple). Take 10. Take 20. If there’s no threat, take 30! As long as everyone is having fun at the table, you’re playing it right!

Link

tabletopresources:

[The following is an excerpt from an article on Gnome Stew. I encourage you to check out the full version and other great articles to be found there]

What’s more realistic?

A group of heroes waits in a tavern until adventure finds them …

… or a rich, well-connected patron provides them with the means to set out on the next adventure?

One of the things I’ve learned is that patronage was an essential component for the real-life explorers who ventured into the frontier in the nineteenth century.

I think, following the explorer model, a GM can create scenarios that better reflect the role of a patron.

Casting Call: Groups of adventurers, all with their own projects, appeal to a single entity with an interest in exploration. This requires the party to “audition” their idea and compete with others. Maybe having a party not be chosen during a couple of these might mean the party will be more appreciative of a patron that eventually choses them.

Shared Vision: A patron seeks them out because word is they have a shared vision for an expedition. There’s just one hook: the patron’s help comes with strings attached. The patron (or someone the patron knows) has to tag along, the patron has a theory needing testing, or the patron wants first dibs on some of the treasure.

Rich Widow: There is one person with means and rival groups both seek the patronage. Which group will curry favor and win that patron’s good graces? The patron usually has some peculiar preferences that need be satisfied.

Dirty Money: Not every patron is on the up and up. Does the party know they are dealing with an unscrupulous fellow? You betcha. But are they willing to overlook an indiscretion here and there? Sometimes it helps having a patron who doesn’t play by all the rules. If anything, this can sometimes result in having a colorful character as a patron.

————————————

Check out Tabletop Gaming Resources for more art, tips and tools for your game!

Photoset

dead-man-laughing:

thedancave:

Dungeons and Dragons Achievements!

Original imgur post here: http://m.imgur.com/a/QuSwR

I’ll just leave this here in case a certain DM I know is looking for encounter ideas…

(via tabletopresources)

Photoset

dead-man-laughing:

thedancave:

Dungeons and Dragons Achievements!

Original imgur post here: http://m.imgur.com/a/QuSwR

I’ll just leave this here in case a certain DM I know is looking for encounter ideas…

(via tabletopresources)

Photoset

caitlynkurilich:

The Thurifer, Owler, The Palace Guard, The Archer, & Gwyn | Graphite on Moleskine, 12” x 16 1/2”, 2013.

A collection of various ladyknights and wanderers I’ve drawn. Prints available here.

(via mydnd)

Photo
browsethestacks:

The Thing by Moebius

browsethestacks:

The Thing by Moebius

(via comicblah)

Photo
savingthrowvssexy:

Yup. Just be sure to read my “About me” section first….

savingthrowvssexy:

Yup. Just be sure to read my “About me” section first….

(Source: naughtycpl34)

Photo

(Source: holymotors, via cuntheory)

Photo
piecesofawhole-dawnwalkers:

Just came in today at The Nerd Store.
Now I can make rolls for NPCs off screen for my online gaming systems. MWAHAHAHAHA!

piecesofawhole-dawnwalkers:

Just came in today at The Nerd Store.

Now I can make rolls for NPCs off screen for my online gaming systems. MWAHAHAHAHA!